Tag Archives | Sniff Off

Sniff Off 2016 Highlights

It’s been a huge year for Sniff Off, the NSW Greens campaign against the use of drug dogs at bars, festivals, and public transport! We’ve put out hundreds of updates on drug dog locations throughout NSW, grown from 8,000 to over 25,000 likes on Facebook, and handed out thousands of flyers at festivals, train stations […]

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Police drug dogs target Aboriginal communities

Data obtained by our office reveals what we have always suspected about the intimidatory and discriminatory use of drug dogs, that it targets those communities where more Aboriginal people live. The research found: For every extra 10% by which the population is Indigenous, the population experiences 2.5 more dog searches per 100 people. Aboriginality appears to […]

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A fresh set of embarrassing drug dog figures from Parliament

Documents obtained by the NSW Greens under Freedom of Information show that the Sniff Off campaign is having an impact on reducing drug dog searches. The Greens Sniff Off campaign targets the ineffective and invasive use of drug dogs by the NSW Police. The widespread publication of data that demonstrates the continuing false positive rates […]

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Media release: Police were on duty when they lied on Sniff Off

The Greens have received written confirmation from Police Commissioner Andrew Scipione that all of the police who recently lied about the presence of drug dogs on the Sniff Off Facebook site have been involved in drug dog operations. In a further revelation it was confirmed that two of the police were on duty when they […]

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Greens Call For End To Failed Sniffer Dog Program

The Greens’ bill to end the use of drug detection dogs in a public place without a warrant came to the NSW Parliament this morning. Member for Newtown Jenny Leong MP delivered a speech outlining the Green’s opposition to the costly, ineffective, intimidatory and discriminatory use of sniffer dogs. Ms Leong said: “In NSW, the […]

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NSW Police Minister’s approach to drug testing “wishful thinking, simplistic and rash”

NSW Police Minister Troy Grant has demonstrated that he is not up the job of overseeing an intelligent evidenced based police response to drug use, with his zero tolerance approach to pill testing labelled “wishful thinking, simplistic and rash” by an international committee. Despite all the best evidence, and last night’s Four Corners episode, indicating […]

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Drug driving laws fail the justice test

With the Government intent on massively increasing the numbers of roadside tests for drugs administered each year by more than 300% attention has rightly been focused on the utter failure of the program to improve road safety. Radio National’s AM program started the year on 1 January 2016 with consideration of the flawed program:   […]

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100,000 NSW residents to be targeted in ‘wasteful, unfair’ roadside drug testing

Information obtained by the Greens through the freedom of information process has shown that the current roadside drug testing regime is arbitrary, invasive and has no relationship to the impairment of drivers on our roads. The complete set of documents obtained through this process is available for download and sharing on our Open Government NSW […]

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Don’t like sniffer dogs? There’s a party for that

As reported by In The Mix: If you – like drug research experts, harm minimisation campaigners and the NSW Greens – believe that drug sniffer dogs are ineffective and cause more harm than harm-prevention, then there’s a party for you. The “Sniff Off” party, happening in Sydney this Saturday, will protest against the use of […]

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EVENT Sniff Off Party

Drug sniffer dogs do not work. In fact they are wrong 64-72% of the time. When they do find drugs, it is normally a small amount for personal use – only 2% of searches result in a supply conviction. The police use of drug dogs disproportionately affects the poor, Aboriginal and queer communities. Young people […]

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